The Bourgeois Empire - ECW Press

The Bourgeois Empire

Christie, Evie

$12.95
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    Everything should stay as it is, or you will lose everything, and that’s how it is for everyone.

    Today was a day for getting along, liver-healing, a cocktail party and a faster wireless connection that tolerates renovated turn-of-the-century walls and allows Candy Cane (or Coconut?) to become a part of your afternoon en suite bathroom caucus. Life is not good, but it feels good, on occasion, baby, is what you might type.
    — from The Bourgeois Empire

    Paranoia, pills, and torrent after torrent of glorious porn. A marriage devoid of both sex and emotion. A broken hand, a perpetually surreal home reno, a dying dog.

    For Jules, a successful professional with a wife and kids, all of this would be manageable — if it wasn’t for Charlie. Because fifteen-year-old girls, dear reader, are something different entirely.

    Jules is obsessed with a teenager — he’s falling head over heels and attempting to arrest the march of time. He's a man, dammit — a man’s man, a guy’s guy — and that’s all that matters.

    The Bourgeois Empire, Evie Christie's first novel, is a Nabokovian fever dream, an encyclopedic guide to mortal sin, and a thoroughly contemporary reimagining of Billy Wilder’s classic film The Lost Weekend. And yes, of course, it’s a love story too.

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    Evie Christie is currently working on an adaptation of Racine's Andromache for Graham McLaren and Necessary Angel Theatre Company which has been commissioned by Luminato (2011). Her work can (very rarely) be found in journals such as Matrix, Quill & Quire, Joyland, Taddle Creek, Filling Station, and the anthologies Jailbreaks: 99 Canadian Sonnets (Biblioasis, 2008), Approaches to Poetry: The Pre-Poem Moment (Poems and Essays) and IV Lounge Nights (Tightrope, 2008). She lives in Toronto, Ontario.

  • Published: October 2010

    ISBN: 9781550229356

    Dimensions: 5.5 x 8.5 in.

    Pages: 112

Reviews

“The most striking thing about Evie Christie’s unconventional debut novel, The Bourgeois Empire, is its point of view — not because of its use of the second person, which is a formal device that Christie is willing to let slip on occasion, but for the withering cold eye it casts on masculine stereotypes. . . . That the book works so well is testament both to Christie’s wonderfully alert writing and the way she maintains a perfectly balanced moral tone throughout.” — National Post

“Evie Christie's debut novel is brutally brilliant. . . . Christie puts you in the shoes of this despicable man, but ties the laces with compassion.” — Telegraph-Journal

The Bourgeois Empire, Christie’s second book and first novel, pulses with that same sexual intensity she brought to Gutted, only magnified tenfold. . . . The take is as brave and seductive as it is corrupt, and as pornographic as it is beautiful.” — Broken Pencil